Monday numbers

Monday numbers

(This edition of Monday numbers is a final look at 2016 and includes at least one number from each month of Monday numbers in the past year on issues that policymakers should address in 2017)

30—number of years since President Ronald Reagan called the EITC “the best anti-poverty, the best pro-family, the best job creation measure to come out of Congress” (“Earned Income Tax Credit,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)

3—number of years since North Carolina allowed its state EITC to end in 2013 (“States Can Adopt or Expand Earned Income Tax Credits to Build a Stronger Future Economy,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, January 19, 2016)

0—number of other states with a state EITC that have allowed it to expire in the last 30 years (“BTC BRIEF: First in Flight from the EITC – Low-Income Working Families Bid Farewell to NC’s Earned Income Tax Credit, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, March 2014)

27.3—percentage of children in North Carolina under age five living in poverty in 2014 (2016 North Carolina Child Health Report Card, NC Child and N.C. Institute of Medicine)

19.7—percentage of children in North Carolina living in poverty in 2007 (Child Poverty Rates Increased During the Great Recession, NCSL, 2010)

28—percentage of laid off workers in the United States who receive unemployment benefits (“The Legacy of House Bill 4: North Carolina’s Unemployment Insurance Program Is No Longer Working Presentation,” National Employment Law Project and North Carolina Justice Center, April 7, 2016)

12—percentage of laid off workers in North Carolina who currently receive unemployment benefits (Ibid)

49—rank of North Carolina in the percentage of laid off workers who currently receive unemployment benefits (Ibid)

31—number of states and the District of Columbia that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act and provided health care coverage to millions of previously uninsured adults (“Beyond the Reduction in Uncompensated Care: Medicaid Expansion Is Having a Positive Impact on Safety Net Hospitals and Clinics,” Georgetown University Center for Children and Families and Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, June 2016)

500,000—number of low-income people in North Carolina who would receive health care coverage if Medicaid was expanded (“Factsheet: Expanding Medicaid in North Carolina, N.C. Justice Center, March 2015)

14.5 million—amount in dollars of taxpayer funding received by the two companies to operate the virtual charter schools in North Carolina in the 2015-2016 school year (“North Carolina’s virtual charters off to a rocky start,” Progressive Pulse, January 21, 2016)

32—percentage of students at  N.C. Connections Academy, operated by Pearson, that had dropped out of the virtual charter school as of its eighth month of operation  (“State lawmakers poised to loosen rules for virtual charter schools,” May 21, 2016)

30—percentage of students at N.C. Virtual Academy, operated by K12, Inc., that had dropped out of the virtual charter school as of its eighth month of operation (Ibid)

15,500—amount in dollars of the average total state tax cut for the top one percent of taxpayers in North Carolina since 2013 (“The Road to Nowhere Good for North Carolina :Latest Tax Changes That Aim for Zero Income Tax Continue to Benefit the Wealthy at the Expense of Working North Carolinians and Communities, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, August 2016)

1,000,000—amount in dollars of the average annual income of the top one percent of taxpayers in North Carolina (Ibid)

167—amount in dollars of the average total state tax cut for middle income taxpayers in North Carolina since 2013 (Ibid)

87—percentage of schools that received a grade of A or A+ng on the A-F grading system for the 2015-2016 school year with less than 50 percent of students who qualify for free or reduced lunch (“2015–16 Performance and Growth of North Carolina Public Schools,” N.C. Department of Public Instruction, September 1, 2016)

98—percentage of schools that received a grade of F on the A-F grading system for the 2015-2016 school year with more than 50 percent of students who qualify for free or reduced lunch (Ibid)

57—percentage of wages of other college graduates earned by teachers in North Carolina (“How to Build an Economy that Works for All: Attract—and Keep—High-Quality Teachers in the Classroom with Competitive Pay,” N.C. Justice Center, October 2016)

64—national average of percentage of wages of other college graduates earned by teachers (Ibid)

49—rank of North Carolina in wage competitiveness of teacher salaries (Ibid)

630,000—number of households in North Carolina in which people do not have enough food to eat (“Hunger in the Tar Heel State, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, November 2016)

8—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states with the highest levels of food insecurity (Ibid)

29.8 million—increase in the number of uninsured people in the United States in 2019 if Congress partially repeals the Affordable Care Act through the budget reconciliation process as many Republicans have proposed (“Implications of Partial Repeal of the ACA through Reconciliation,” Urban Institute, December 6, 2016)