Monday numbers

Monday numbers

pv-bp66—percentage of jobs in North Carolina by 2020 that will require a post-secondary education (“NC’s plummeting commitment to higher ed is a recipe for economic disaster,” Progressive Pulse, October 5, 2016)

81—percentage increase in tuition at community college in North Carolina since 2009 (Ibid)

50—percentage increase in average tuition at public four-year universities in North Carolina since 2008-09 academic year (Ibid)

85—percentage increase in tuition at UNC-Chapel Hill since 2009 (Ibid)

15—decline in per student state funding at public four-year universities in North Carolina since 2008 (Ibid)

2 billion—amount in dollars of cost of the tax reduction passed by the General Assembly in the last four years when fully implemented (Ibid)

660 million—amount in dollars of the funding cuts to UNC schools since 2010 (Ibid)

12—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in the largest cuts in state spending per student in higher education since 2008 (“Funding Down, Tuition Up: State Cuts to Higher Education Threaten Quality and Affordability at Public Colleges, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, August 15, 2016) 

90—percentage of Pell grant recipients—the lowest-income students pursuing a postsecondary education—who graduate with debt (“NC’s plummeting commitment to higher ed is a recipe for economic disaster,” Progressive Pulse, October 5, 2016)

45—percentage of students attending four-year schools who work more than 20 hours per week (“With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them: Myths and Realities About Why So Many Students Fail to Finish College,” A Public Agenda Report for The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation)

60—percentage of student attending community colleges who work more than 20 hours a week (Ibid)

25—percentage of students attending community colleges who work more than 35 hours a week (Ibid)

52—percentage of college students who did not complete their college program who say that they couldn’t afford the tuition and fees (Ibid)