Monday numbers

Monday numbers

yir-2015(This edition of Monday numbers is a final look at 2015 and includes at least one number from each month of Monday numbers in the past year that policymakers should address in 2016)

43—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states in average teacher pay (“TABOR would guarantee a permanent place at the bottom for North Carolina, Progressive Pulse, August 26, 2015)

1—rank of North Carolina among the states for the largest decline in average teacher salaries from 2003-2004 to 2013-2014 (Ibid)

5.8—percentage increase in productivity in North Carolina during the ongoing recovery from the Great Recession (“The State of Working North Carolina 2015,” N.C. Justice Center)

3—percentage decrease in wages in North Carolina during the ongoing recovery from the Great Recession (Ibid)

88—number of Americans killed every day with a gun (“Gun Violence by the Numbers, Everytown for Gun Safety, September 28, 2015)

7—number of people under the age of 19 who are killed by a gun every day in the United States (Ibid)

1,815—amount in dollars of the annual tax cut in the budget passed by the General Assembly in 2015 for the wealthiest one percent of taxpayers (“Chartbook: Four Charts on the Final Budget, N.C. Budget & Tax Center, September 16, 2015)

7—amount in dollars of the annual INCREASE in taxes in the budget for the lowest 20 percent of taxpayers, with annual incomes below $20,000 (Ibid)

135—number of days since spokesman for the N.C. Education Lottery told the Raleigh News & Observer that lottery officials “don’t want people playing with the rent, food, or gas money.” (“North Carolina could widen lottery’s reach, Raleigh News & Observer, August 22, 2015)

468—amount in dollars of the lottery sales per capita on Halifax County in 2014 (Ibid)

2—rank of Halifax County among 100 counties in highest lottery sales per capita (Ibid)

27.4—percentage of people in Halifax living below the poverty level (U.S. Census Bureau)

61—percentage of North Carolina workers who earn less than $20,000 a year who have no access to paid sick leave (“Caregivers at Risk: The urgent need for fair pay and paid leave for all of NC’s caregivers, ”N.C. Justice Center, June 2014)

38—percentage of North Carolina workers who earn between $20,000 and $35,000 a year who have no access to paid sick leave (Ibid)

30,000—minimum reduction in voter turnout in the 2014 election caused by new voting limitations and polling-place problems (“Alarm Bells from Silenced Voters,” Democracy North Carolina, May 2015)

39—rank of North Carolina among the 50 states with the highest average student loan debt of graduates of 4-year colleges and universities in 2013 (Institute for College Access & Success, Project on Student Debt)

28,312—amount in dollars of the average student loan debt of graduates of East Carolina University in 2013, the highest in the University of North Carolina system (Ibid)

90—percentage of graduates of Fayetteville State University in 2013 with student loan debt, the highest percentage in the University of North Carolina system (Ibid)

28 billion—amount in dollars the University of North Carolina system contributes to the state’s economy (Economic Modeling Specialists International, “Demonstrating the Collective Economic Value of the University of North Carolina System,” Executive Summary, February 2015)

425,000—number of jobs in North Carolina that can be traced back to the impact of the university system (Ibid)

24.9—percentage of reduction in per student funding for the university system since 2008 (“State-by-State Fact Sheets: Higher Education Cuts Jeopardize Students’ and States’ Economic Future, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, March 5, 2015)

2,424—number of public schools in North Carolina that received a letter grade with the release last February of the A-F report card grading system (N.C. Department of Public Instruction)

100—percentage of schools that received a grade of F that have MORE than 50 percent of their students eligible to receive free or reduced lunch (Ibid)

97.9— percentage of schools that received a grade of D that have MORE than 50 percent of their students eligible to receive free or reduced lunch (Ibid)

520 million—amount in dollars of the loss in state revenue from proposed elimination of the state capital gains tax (“A Capital Loss: Eliminating taxes on capital gains would make North Carolina’s tax system more unfair and make the state’s revenue challenge worse,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, January 2015)

67—percentage of benefit of eliminating capital gains tax that would flow to the top one percent of North Carolina taxpayers (“A Capital Loss: Eliminating taxes on capital gains would make North Carolina’s tax system more unfair and make the state’s revenue challenge worse,” N.C. Budget & Tax Center, January 2015)

957,000—amount in dollars of the average income of top one percent of taxpayers in North Carolina (Ibid)

112—number of days until the 2016 session of the General Assembly convenes (N.C. General Assembly)