Monday numbers

Monday numbers

Monday numbers 3

70,000—number of long-term unemployed workers who have exhausted their state unemployment benefits and will lose their benefits under the Federal Emergency Unemployment Compensation Program July 1 unless the General Assembly acts (“Media Release: AFL-CIO, NC Justice Center ask lawmakers to take action, keep families from going over unemployment cliff, N.C. Justice Center, June 3, 2013)

100—percentage of the cost of the emergency unemployment benefits that would be paid by the federal government (Ibid)

0—amount in dollars of the cost to the state of extending emergency unemployment benefits to 70,000 long-term unemployed workers (Ibid)

0—number of other states that have lost emergency federal unemployment benefits as a result of actions or inaction of their state lawmakers (Ibid)

5—rank of NC among the 50 states with the highest unemployment rates (Ibid)

91,000—number of additional long-term unemployed workers in North Carolina who will lose emergency federal unemployment benefits if there are unable to find a job before state benefits expire—unless the General Assembly acts (Ibid)

20 million—amount in dollars pumped into North Carolina’s economy each week by emergency federal unemployment benefits (“70,000 long-term unemployed in NC lose federal benefits July 1, News &Observer, June 8, 2013)

700 million—amount in total dollars that unemployed workers in North Carolina stand to lose in emergency federal benefits unless General Assembly acts before July 1 (“Benefits running out for 70,000 jobless, the Progressive Pulse, May 28, 2013)

26—maximum number of weeks laid off workers in North Carolina could receive unemployment benefits under law before the General Assembly changed it earlier this year (Overhauling the State’s Unemployment Insurance System: New Proposal Takes NC from the Middle of the Pack all the Way to the Back, N.C. Justice Center, January 2013)

43—number of states that pay a maximum of 26 weeks of unemployment benefits (Ibid)

20—maximum number of weeks laid off workers in North Carolina can receive unemployment benefits under sliding scale in the law passed by the General Assembly earlier this year (Ibid)

12—maximum number of weeks some laid off workers in North Carolina could receive unemployment benefits under sliding scale in the law passed by the General Assembly earlier this year (Ibid)

1—number of other states that currently have a sliding scale for maximum length of benefit that begins as a low as 12 weeks (Ibid)

15—number of months that Rep. Jason Saine collected unemployment benefits including emergency federal benefits before he was appointed to the General Assembly (“Legislator voted to cut jobless benefits he once received,” N.C. Policy Watch, February 21, 2013)

4—number of months since Rep. Saine and the majority in the House and Senate voted for law limiting the length of time people can receive benefits to as few as 12 weeks (Ibid)