Monday numbers

Monday numbers

- in Fitzsimon File

67,000—estimated number of at-risk kids in North Carolina eligible for More at Four early childhood program (“NC judge orders pre-kindergarten services restored,” Associated Press, July 20, 2011)

32,000—estimated number of at-risk kids served by More at Four in 2010-2011 (Ibid)

32 million—amount in dollars that the biennial budget approved by the General Assembly this summer cut from More at Four funding (House Bill 200, Appropriations Act of 2011)

4,000—number of slots for at-risk children in More at Four lost because of the budget cuts (“NC judge orders pre-kindergarten services restored,” Associated Press, July 20, 2011)

34—number of days since Superior Court Judge Howard Manning ruled that budget changes made in 2011 by the General Assembly to early childhood programs denies at-risk children the sound, basic education guaranteed them in the N.C. Constitution (“NC judge orders pre-kindergarten services restored,” Associated Press, July 20, 2011)

0—number of changes made by the General Assembly to early childhood funding since Judge Manning’s ruling

5—number of days since Governor Beverly Perdue issued an executive order to open NC Pre-Kindergarten Program (formerly known as More at Four) to all at-risk children eligible for the program (Office of Governor Beverly Perdue, Executive Order 100: N.C. Pre Kindergarten Program)

0—number of announcements by legislative leaders that they will make the changes necessary to respond to Judge Manning’s ruling or shift money to open NC Pre-Kindergarten Program to all at–risk children as required by Governor Perdue’s executive order

72 million—amount in dollars amount in dollars that the biennial budget approved by the General Assembly this summer cuts from Smart Start (House Bill 200, Appropriations Act of 2011)

104 million—total amount in dollars cut in early childhood programs in the biennial budget approved by the General Assembly this summer. (Ibid)

1,250—amount in dollars spent per child on children enrolled in More At Four (“From Birth to School: Examining the Effects of Early Childhood Programs on Educational Outcomes in NC,” Duke University March 16, 2011)

250—amount in dollars spent per child on children involved in Smart Start (Ibid)

15—percentage decrease in the placement of children in special education programs in counties with significant investments in children through Smart Start and More At Four (Ibid)

4—number of extra months of education that achievement increase in students in counties with Smart Start and More at Four equals (Ibid)

31—percentage increase in children attending high quality child care centers since 2001 when Smart Start began tracking data (Smart Start and the N.C. Partnership for Children)

98—percentage of children recommended health screenings after Smart Start launched the Assuring Better Child Health and Development program (Ibid)

79—percentage of children who attended high quality child care centers who scored average or high on a standardized math test (Smart Start and Preschool Child Care Quality in NC: Change Over time and Relation to Children’s Readiness, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, 2003)

55—percentage of children who attended low quality child care centers who scored average or high on standardized math test (Ibid)

8.79—amount in dollars of the present value on each dollar invested in Smart Start or More at Four (New evidence for large state and local returns from investments in preschool and child care: Duke University study of North Carolina’s programs, Tim Bartik, March 18, 2011)