Monday numbers

Monday numbers

- in Fitzsimon File

96—number of charter schools currently operating in North Carolina (N.C. Department of Public Instruction, Office of Charter Schools)

100—state cap on the number of charter schools (Ibid)

0—difference in the number of subgroups of students in charter schools in North Carolina performing better than public school counterparts and those performing worse, as found in study funded by pro-charter school foundations ("Multiple Choice: Charter School Performance in 16 States," State Reports, Center for Research on Education Outcomes at Stanford University, 2009.)

0—number of times that Stanford study showing that African-American students in charters schools in North Carolina perform significantly below their traditional public school counterparts in math, with no discernable difference in reading has been cited in North Carolina charter school debate in the General Assembly (Ibid)

17— percent of charter schools reporting academic gains significantly better than traditional public schools in study funded by pro-charter school foundations ("Multiple Choice: Charter School Performance in 16 States," Center for Research on Education Outcomes at Stanford University, 2009.)

37— percent of charter schools showing gains that were worse than their traditional public school counterparts in study funded by pro-charter school foundations (Ibid)

46—percent of charter schools demonstrating no significant difference in gains than their traditional public school counterparts in study funded by pro-charter school foundations (ibid)

25—percent of fourth graders attending charter schools proficient in reading according to data collected in 2003 but not released by the U.S. Department of Education. (Diane Ravitch, The Death and Life of the Great American School System and New York Times, August 17, 2004)

25—percent of fourth graders attending charter schools proficient in math according to data collected in 2003 but not released by the U.S. Department of Education. (Diane Ravitch, The Death and Life of the Great American School System and New York Times, August 17, 2004)

30—percent of fourth graders attending traditional public schools proficient in reading according to data collected in 2003 but not released by the U.S. Department of Education. (Diane Ravitch, The Death and Life of the Great American School System and New York Times, August 17, 2004)

32— percent of fourth graders attending traditional public schools proficient in math according to data collected in 2003 but not released by the U.S. Department of Education. (Diane Ravitch, The Death and Life of the Great American School System and New York Times, August 17, 2004)

4—years since the U.S. Department of Education Department released a study that children in public schools performed as well or better in reading and mathematics than comparable children in private schools. (New York Times, July 15, 2006, "Comparing Private Schools and Public Schools Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling," National Assessment of Student Progress)

About the author

Chris Fitzsimon, Founder and Executive Director of N.C. Policy Watch, writes the Fitzsimon File, delivers a radio commentary broadcast on WRAL-FM and hosts "News and Views," a weekly radio news magazine that airs on multiple stations across North Carolina.
[email protected]
919-861-2066